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State of Colorado

Judicial Selection in the States: Colorado

Overview

News

The North Carolina Senate has voted to override the governor s veto of HB 100, a bill to take return the state s trial court...

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The Oklahoma House and Senate this week advanced bills to change the way the state s appellate courts in general, and their supreme court in...

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A plan to expand public information about Montana Supreme Court races has been filed in that state s House. First, some background. Montana uses a...

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Courtesy of the Bureau of Justice Statistics, U.S. Department of...

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The Colorado judiciary is composed of a supreme court, a court of appeals, a district court, and various trial courts of limited jurisdiction. Under Colorado's original constitution, judges were elected by the people, but in 1966, voters approved a constitutional initiative calling for merit selection of judges. Under Colorado's merit selection system, judges are appointed by the governor from a list of nominees submitted by a judicial nominating commission, and judges stand for retention at least two years after their appointment. In 1988, the Colorado general assembly created judicial performance commissions throughout the state to provide voters with information about the performance of judicial retention candidates.