Select a State:

State of Pennsylvania

Judicial Selection in the States: Pennsylvania

Overview

News

The North Carolina Senate has voted to override the governor s veto of HB 100, a bill to take return the state s trial court...

Read More...

The Oklahoma House and Senate this week advanced bills to change the way the state s appellate courts in general, and their supreme court in...

Read More...

A plan to expand public information about Montana Supreme Court races has been filed in that state s House. First, some background. Montana uses a...

Read More...

Courtesy of the Bureau of Justice Statistics, U.S. Department of...

Read More...

The Pennsylvania judiciary is composed of a supreme court, a superior court, a commonwealth court, a court of common pleas, and various minor courts. The supreme, superior, and commonwealth courts are appellate courts, and the court of common pleas is the trial court of general jurisdiction. Pennsylvania judges are chosen in partisan elections. Pennsylvania is one of only two states that holds its judicial elections in off years in conjunction with municipal elections.

Pennsylvania organizations such as Pennsylvanians for Modern Courts and the Pennsylvania Bar Association have worked for many years to promote merit selection and retention for Pennsylvania's judges. Former governor Tom Ridge was strongly committed to promoting merit selection, convening three summit meetings on the subject in the spring and summer of 2001, but he resigned the governorship in the fall of 2001 to head the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. The new Pennsylvania governor, Ed Rendell, pledged during his election campaign to pursue merit selection as governor, describing merit selection as "an idea whose time has come." In 2007, Governor Rendell included providing for merit selection of judges in a six-pronged proposal for restoring the public's trust in Pennsylvania government.